Category Archives: Unreal Engine 4

[TIP] Dynamic Idle Animation


In this quick tip I’ll show you how to make dynamic idle animation that feels more alive. I’ll be using Sword Animset Pro by Kubold for this tutorial but you can use any animation set (or your own) as long as you have Aim Offsets.

End result:

You can create an Aim Offset from Content Browser under Animation -> Aim Offset:

After that, open your AimOffset asset you just created and set the Axis Settings. In this example, I’ll call them HorizontalAngle and VerticalAngle and set their minimum/maximum values to -90 and 90 respectively. So if the value is -90 horizontal then player will be looking to the left or if its 90 then player will look to the right. The same goes for vertical also. If its 90 then player looks up and -90 means looking down.

NOTE: For the sake of this tutorial, we will use LookAround asset that is included in Sword Animset Pro.

Now that our Aim Offsets are done its time to modify the Animation Blueprint Graph for your character. I wont be covering how to create the animation graph and assign it to your character. If you are not familiar with it you can read more about AnimGraph here.

The basic idea for this system is to create random “look at” points around our character within our vision cone (that is 90 degrees up and right) and we will use those values to drive our LookAround aim offset. In you Animation Event graph you have to create a graph like below. The comments in the screenshot should explain what the system does :). (psst click image for high resolution)

Once that setup is finished you simply have to use those values in your Anim Graph.

That’s it! You have your own Dynamic Idle Animation. You can play with all those values in Event Graph and make it more alive 🙂

UE4 Binary Builder


Want to make your own binary build of Unreal Engine 4 to distribute among your team members?

Download this app then: http://bit.ly/UE4_BinaryMaker

Source code: http://bit.ly/UE4_BinaryMaker_Source

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[TIP] Creating your custom definitions for your UE4 games


Some developers might require their game to be different based on specific builds. For example you make a game and you want to release a demo but don’t want to include certain features. This is actually very easy to achieve. Like literally…very easy. 🙂

Open your MyProject.Build.cs file and modify it like this:

/* True if this should compile as a demo build */
const bool bIsDemoBuild = true;

/* Add a new definition called IS_DEMO_BUILD. This will be 1 (true) if bIsDemoBuild is true. Else it will be false (0) */
Definitions.Add(string.Format(“IS_DEMO_BUILD={0}”, (bIsDemoBuild ? “1” : “0”)));

Close your project solution file, right click on your *.uproject file and select Generate Visual Studio project files.

Generate Visual Studio project files.

That’s it! In your header/source files you can now use like this:

#if IS_DEMO_BUILD
UE_LOG(LogTemp, Log, TEXT(“This is a demo build”))
#else
UE_LOG(LogTemp, Log, TEXT(“This is release build”))
#endif

The good thing about this approach is its not just a simple if else condition. The compiler is actually removing the entire code inside that macro based on the condition. 🙂

New Marketplace page


I’ve added a new Marketplace page on the menu. It will show you all the items I have made for Unreal Engine 4 Marketplace. Feel free to buy them! 😉

Unreal X-Reader


I just made a small app that can read Unreal log files. Here is a screenshot:

Download

Unreal Engine Bug Tracker now live!


Unreal Engine bug tracker is now available to the public! That means you can check the status of an issue when the developers reference a ticket number in Answerhub posts and Forums. Once you have found the issue you are interested in, you have a wealth of information at your fingertips, such as:

Issue description
Reproduction steps
Affected versions of the engine
The status of the issue (whether fixed or not)
Targeted version goal for a fix
Links back to any community pages where the issue was reported or wherever the ticket ID number has been referenced.

If the issue has been fixed, the site will automatically link to its GitHub commit whenever possible so that source code developers can grab and integrate the fix into their codebase without having to wait for the next binary engine release!

Epic also implemented a voting system so that you can highlight the issues that you care about the most. This allows you to track the issues you have voted on and allows Epic to review the top votes to see the issues that are most important to our community of developers.

Simple Vehicle AI (inspired from Death Rally)


So last night I wanted to experiment if its possible to do Death Rally kinda AI and here is the result. All done in Blueprints.

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